Leo Strauss, Father of the Neocons

August 27, 2008 at 11:37 pm (Big Brother)

There are two great articles I read recently which explain a vast majority of what’s going on in the minds of the current ruling administration.  Due to the relentless media propaganda, the obvious lies, and the ridiculous opinions of its followers, I’ve always wondered just what the true beliefs of the Bush clique were, and now I think I know.  Here is article one and here is article two.  Or, if you’re more of the liberal bent than the libertarian, and are turned off by Ron Paul, here they are in reverse order; article two and article one.

Noteworthy excerpts include:

“The people will not be happy to learn that there is only one natural right – the right of the superior to rule over the inferior, the master over the slave, the husband over the wife, and the wise few over the vulgar many. In On Tyranny, Strauss refers to this natural right as the “tyrannical teaching” of his beloved ancients. It is tyrannical in the classic sense of rule above rule or in the absence of law (p. 70).

Now, the ancients were determined to keep this tyrannical teaching secret because the people are not likely to tolerate the fact that they are intended for subordination; indeed, they may very well turn their resentment against the superior few. Lies are thus necessary to protect the superior few from the persecution of the vulgar many.

The effect of Strauss’s teaching is to convince his acolytes that they are the natural ruling elite and the persecuted few. And it does not take much intelligence for them to surmise that they are in a situation of great danger, especially in a world devoted to the modern ideas of equal rights and freedoms. Now more than ever, the wise few must proceed cautiously and with circumspection. So, they come to the conclusion that they have a moral justification to lie in order to avoid persecution. Strauss goes so far as to say that dissembling and deception – in effect, a culture of lies – is the peculiar justice of the wise.”

and:

“…lying is central to the survival of nations and to the success of great enterprises, because if our enemies can count on the reliability of everything you say, your vulnerability is enormously increased.” What about the effects of lying on one’s own people? Who cares if a leader can fool the enemy? Does calling it “strategic deception” make lying morally justifiable? Ledeen and Machiavelli argue that it does, as long as the survivability of the state is at stake. Preserving the state is their goal, even if the personal liberty of all individuals has to be suspended or canceled.”Disclaimer: please don’t think I’m advocating for Obama, or McCain, in the slightest.  I have a hard time choosing between dying of ebola and dying of dysentery.

 

Today’s article of doom: FBI gets to investigate (spy) even when there is no basis for suspicion.

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